Blog Archive

Programming in F#

Posted By: Jingyi on July 27, 2010

F# became a first class citizen in Visual Studio 2010. What is F#? F# is a multiparadigm programming language built on .NET, which supports functional programming, object-oriented programming and imperative programming (F# allows you to modify the contents of memory). F# is also statically typed but has type inference built in it. Most of time, the programmers don’t need to explicitly put the type annotation for the variables/identifiers since the compiler will automatically figure it out. For example, let a = 1 is a valid expression. However, the real story will be let (a : int) = 1. Because the compiler can figure out the type of a is int, the programmer doesn’t need put the type when he introduces the value a.

A while ago, I found a problem on the MIT website. Here is the problem: You are given an arithmetic expression containing N real numbers and N -…

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NoSQL: HuMONGOus Benefits (Part 2)

Posted By: Nick Floyd on July 14, 2010

At Fellowship Technologies we’ve utilized NoSQL as a persistent caching mechanism.  We used MongoDB as our NoSQL data store.  MongoDB is a document-based schema-less data store.  MongoDB was an ideal solution because we had a dataset where we needed to cache a dataset with a varying set of fields.

Installing Mongo

To install MongoDB go to the MongoDB site and choose the right version for your platform.  If you have an OS with 64-bit capabilities then you should choose a 64-bit version of MongoDB because the 32-bit version has a 4GB memory limitation.  Since MongoDB relies on memory mapped files the 4GB limit doesn’t necessarily pertain to the size of your database.  Extract the MongoDB files from the archive.  Go into the bin folder and run mongod to run the mongodb server.  Specify the —dbpath flag to specify the directory where the data files will be created and…

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Our Scrum Team Structure

Posted By: Lance Dacy on July 8, 2010

At Fellowship Technologies, we value team work and collaboration. In fact, as part of our Scrum implementation, we tend to focus on creating self-organizing teams that strive for excellence on the first principle of the Agile Manifesto (individuals and interactions over processes and tools). Who better to estimate and organize the work at hand than the people actually doing the work? This creative and cohesive environment is one that we value for each of our teams.

As we grow in experience and education, we adapt and change your environment which in the end makes us all stronger. That is what I love most about our teams, their ability to look back, adapt to the realities seen, and strive to do better today than they did yesterday.

In our Product Development organization, we currently employ three (3) Scrum Teams. While each team should be able…

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