Blog Archive

API snack - people search

Posted By: Nick Floyd on June 15, 2009

A quick look at people search in the REST API. We briefly touch on query string parameters, paging, portal interaction, and content types.

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The API, what is it and what can it do for me?

Posted By: Nick Floyd on June 12, 2009

We’ve been getting that question a lot lately.  Though seeming harmless, those questions deal with what the core intent of an API should be:  An API’s focus is not really what it does for the Service Provider (though there are some seriously obvious benefits to the Service Provider) but what it does TO the community, the consumers.


A few years ago I jokingly “redefined” the acronym API (Application Programmable Interface) as:

API (Association Producing Interchange): “The interface that a community of developers uses to collaborate, innovate, and build on ideas to change and invigorate a software experience.”  We have a unique opportunity as developers; we can come together using our various backgrounds and knowledge to make a really great “something” - but we have to connect with people not just systems.

Let’s ask the questions above differently: This is the API, now what am I going to…

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Fellowship One REST API is alive!

Posted By: Nick Floyd on June 8, 2009

A year has passed since we announced the thoughts behind having a new API for the community.  We spent a lot of time engaging you, crafting code, building applications, and working on solidifying what turned out to be a retro-revolution.  As I stated in a previous post:

This next generation of API is, ironically based on foundations that have been in place for years.  We chose MVC as the application architecture, OAUTH protocol for Authentication, REST and HTTP 1.1 as the transfer protocol.  This API should give web developers a tool where all they have to think about is what to do with the resources.

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Single Sign-on using the API

Posted By: Jas Singh on June 5, 2009

The inspiration of this post comes from Tracy Mazelin. I met with Tracy at the DC09 conference, and she presented me with the problem she was trying to solve. She wanted to provide single sign-on functionality on her site. She wanted to have a login screen on her site, and once the user logs in, she wanted to use that information to access web link, without the user logging in again. This is an interesting problem, and I think the solution may benefit others too. So here is the solution. I am going to assume that you have the latest code of the F1 OAuth PHP library. If not, now is the time to go get it. By the very nature of this problem, I am also going to assume that you are a 2nd party application. If you have not yet read my previous post on 2nd party implementation, I would suggest that you stop here and read that one first, because this post is heavily based on that.  In Step 4, after you set the access token and secret using initAccessToken, follow the steps below:

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OAuth PHP library - 2nd Party Implementation

Posted By: Jas Singh on June 4, 2009

My previous blog post illustrated how to use the OAuth PHP library to access the API. That post was targeted towards 3rd party Consumer application. If you are a 2nd party, the code to accomplish the same is a lot shorter.

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OAuth PHP library

Posted By: Jas Singh on June 3, 2009

Couple of weeks ago, I wrote a OAuth PHP library. I have been too lazy to post the code or write a blog about it. This post is an attempt to go over the code snippets for using the library.

First of all, you need to get your hands at the OAuth PHP library.The library distribution consists of a folder named OAuth. This folder contains the core OAuth library. Other files in the distribution are index.php and callback.php. These files already contain all the code you need to get started. I will go over the code in a little bit. To get started, place all the files on your webserver. For sake of simplicity, let’s assume you download all the files into your web root. Follow these steps:

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